K-12

  • The Local Control Funding Formula (LCCF) (2013) overhauled the way California’s public K-12 schools are funded including new provisions related to foster youth. Foster Ed prepared an overview of the LCCF as well as information regarding the provisions specific to foster youth.
  • AB 167 (2009) allows foster children to graduate high school by only completing state graduation requirements if they transferred schools in the 11th or 12th grade and could not reasonably complete local graduation requirements.
  • AB 216 (2013) provides clarification to AB 167 (enacted in 2009) that allows foster children to graduate high school by only completing state graduation requirements if they transferred schools in the 11th or 12th grade and could not reasonably complete local graduation requirements. Click here for a side-by-side comparison prepared by the Alliance for Children’s Rights of how AB 216 changed the provisions of the existing law.
  • AB 379 (2015) Makes foster youth education rights enforceable through the State’s Uniform Complaint Procedure (UCP).
  • AB 490 (2003) requires that all educational and school placement decisions must be based on the child’s best interests and consider, among other factors, educational stability and the least restrictive educational setting necessary to achieve academic progress. The bill also created new educational related reporting requirements for social workers and probation officers and new requirements related to school stability.
  • AB 643 (2013) changed state law in order to conform to the provisions of the federal Uninterrupted Scholars Act which authorizes school districts to share information with child welfare case workers. The Legal Center for Foster Care and Education has created a brief overview of the provisions of the USA that apply in California with the passage of AB 643 and the State Policy and Reform Center (SPARC) recently issued a more in depth brief about the benefits of this new law.
  • AB 854 (2015) expands the definition of foster youth so all students, including those placed with relatives, can access the program and redefines the mandate of the program to collaborate with child welfare, probation, the courts, LEAs, and postsecondary institutions to minimize school placement changes and improve education outcomes.